Info and installation help for various file types.

Please note that all instructions and suggestions here refer to Windows PCs. I cannot personally suggest any steps for Mac users.

These files are not widely distributed and therefore not overused, providing you with assets that are fairly unique in the big picture.

Ogg Audio Files

Ogg audio files offer more freedom of usage, legally speaking, than something like an Mp3, without losing any substantial quality when using comparable settings. You don’t have any licenses to worry about or royalties to pay, unlike some situations when an Mp3 is used.

Ogg files are smaller than Wav files and therefor suitable for long audio tracks and short effects alike.

You can play and edit Ogg files with many different pieces of software. I recommend Audacity for everyday editing needs, such as volume adjustments, trimming, and much more. Audacity is free and available at audacityteam.org.

If you want to get deeper into your audio editing, I use and recommend Cakewalk by Bandcamp (formerly known as Sonar by Cakewalk). Cakewalk is free and available at bandlab.com/products/cakewalk.

Substance Painter Materials:

All Substance samples shown with the free downloads are taken within Substance Painter, Substance Designer, or Substance Player. Renders are done with as few samples as possible using stock shaders and environment maps. What you see is what you get. These assets are typically aimed at a Metal/Rough workflow and users will need to do any necessary conversions on their own.

Substance Painter Materials, or Base Materials, are your main tools in Substance Painter. Without them, you have nothing to look at unless you manually paint every pixel. There are numerous ways to use them and they have many different ways of functioning. If you are not familiar with the very basics of that system, you need to learn more about it before adding new materials to your Shelf.

Locate your downloaded file.
Extract the archive to your desired folder.
Drag the extracted .sbsar file into your Substance Painter shelf.
Set it to basematerial on your import options.

These Substance files can also be used to create basic texture sets with the FREE Substance Player. Get it here: https://www.allegorithmic.com/products/substance-player

NOTE: Many people believe that any Substance material which is not 100% procedurally created is an inferior product. I strongly disagree, but respect that opinion. Many or even most of the Substance materials here are created from images, whether they are photos or completely computer generated. This is how I like to make use of the photos I take or to get added value and life out of my artificial creations. With that said, they are all edited in Photoshop before having even more features added to them in Substance Designer and finally exported for use in Substance Painter and other applications. While it may result in larger .sbsar files, this method keeps creation time as low as possible and helps to better capture the look and feel of real world objects or places as they are when I see them in front of me. Finally, it allows me to have much more time out and about versus spending all of my time in front of the screen, combining those things to make something I can share with the world.

Substance Painter Alphas

Substance Painter Alphas are used like a brush for the most part. You can use them to paint or erase.

Locate your downloaded file.
Extract the archive to your desired folder.
Drag the extracted .sbsar file into your Substance Painter shelf.
Set it to alpha on your import options.

Substance Painter Fonts

Substance Painter Fonts are Alphas, stored in the Alpha shelf, but allow you to type in custom text that can be used like a brush. You can use them to paint or erase.

Locate your downloaded file.
Extract the archive to your desired folder.
Drag the extracted .sbsar file into your Substance Painter shelf.
Set it to alpha on your import options.